Install Xcode Cli Tools

Xcode

Xcode uses the selected toolchain for building Swift code, debugging, and even code completion and syntax coloring. You’ll see a new toolchain indicator in Xcode’s toolbar when Xcode is using a Swift toolchain. Select the Xcode toolchain to go back to Xcode’s built-in tools. Selecting a Swift toolchain affects the Xcode IDE only. The flutter command-line tool is how developers (or IDEs on behalf of developers) interact with Flutter. Here’s how you might use the flutter tool to create, analyze, test, and run an app. The command firebase -help lists the available commands and firebase -help shows more details for an individual command. If a command is project-specific, you must either be inside a project directory with an active project alias or specify the Firebase project id with the -P flag.

Technical Note TN2339

This document provides answers to frequently asked questions about command line tools.

What is the Command Line Tools Package?

The Command Line Tools Package is a small self-contained package available for download separately from Xcode and that allows you to do command line development in macOS. It consists of the macOS SDK and command-line tools such as Clang, which are installed in the /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools directory.

Downloading command-line tools is not available in Xcode for macOS 10.9. How can I install them on my machine?

In macOS 10.9 and later, the Downloads pane of Xcode Preferences does not support downloading command-line tools. Use any of the following methods to install command-line tools on your system:

  • Install Xcode

    If Xcode is installed on your machine, then there is no need to install them. Xcode comes bundled with all your command-line tools. macOS 10.9 and later includes shims or wrapper executables. These shims, installed in /usr/bin, can map any tool included in /usr/bin to the corresponding one inside Xcode. xcrun is one of such shims, which allows you to find or run any tool inside Xcode from the command line. Use it to invoke any tool within Xcode from the command line as shown in Listing 1.


    Listing 1 Using xcrun to run dwarfdump in the Terminal application.

  • Download the Command Line Tools package from the Developer website

    The Command Line Tools package is available for download on the Download for Apple Developers page. Log in with your Apple ID, then search and download the Command Line Tools package appropriate for your machine such as macOS 10.12 as shown in Figure 1.

Note: In macOS 10.9 and later, Software update notifies you when new versions of the command-line tools are available for update.

  • Install the Command Line Tools package via the Terminal application

    You can install the Command Line Tools package by running the xcode-select --install command.

    Note: macOS comes bundled with xcode-select, a command-line tool that is installed in /usr/bin. It allows you to manage the active developer directory for Xcode and other BSD development tools. See its man page for more information.

How can I uninstall the command-line tools?

  • Xcode includes all of the command-line tools. If it is installed on your system, remove it to uninstall the command-line tools.

  • If the /Library/Developer/CommandLineTools directory exists on your system, remove it to uninstall the command-line tools.

I have multiple versions of Xcode installed on my machine. What version of Xcode do the command-line tools currently use?

To find out what version of Xcode is being used by your tools, run the following command in Terminal:

Listing 2 Printing the version of Xcode currently used by the command-line tools.

How do I select the default version of Xcode to use for my command-line tools?

To select a default Xcode for your command-line tools, run the following command in Terminal:

where <path/to/> is the path to the Xcode.app package you wish to use for development.

Listing 3 Setting the default Xcode version.

How do I build my projects from the command line?

xcodebuild is a command-line tool that allows you to perform build, query, analyze, test, and archive operations on your Xcode projects and workspaces from the command line. It operates on one or more targets contained in your project, or a scheme contained in your project or workspace. xcodebuild provides several options for performing these operations as seen its man page. xcodebuild saves the output of your commands in the locations defined in the Locations preferences pane of your Xcode application, by default.

See below for various xcodebuild usage. Be sure to navigate to the directory containing your project or workspace in Terminal before running any of the following commands.

  • To list all schemes in your workspace, run the following command in Terminal:

    where <your_workspace_name> is the name of your workspace.


    Listing 4 Listing all schemes in the MyApplication workspace.

  • To list all targets, build configurations, and schemes used in your project, run the following command in Terminal:

    where <your_project_name> is the name of your project.


    Listing 5 Listing all information about MyProject, an Xcode project.

  • To build a scheme in your project, run the following command in Terminal:

    where <your_scheme_name> and build are respectively the name of your scheme to be built and the action to be performed on your scheme.


    Listing 6 Building the tvOS scheme.

    Note: xcodebuild supports various build actions such as build, analyze, and archive that can be performed on your target or scheme. However, build is performed by default when no action is specified as shown in Listing 7.

  • To build your target with a configuration file, run the following command in Terminal:

    where <your_target_name> and <your_configuration_file> are respectively the name of your target to be built and the name of your configuration file. See Xcode Help's Build configuration file reference for more information about xcconfig files.


    Listing 7 Building the iOS target with a configuration file.

  • To change the output locations of your xcodebuild command, use the SYMROOT (Build Products Path) and DSTROOT (Installation Build Products Location) build settings that respectively specify a location for your debug products and .dSYM files and one for your released products. See Xcode Help's Build setting reference for more information about these build settings.


    Listing 8 Setting up a location for iOS' debug app version.


    Listing 9 Setting up a location for iOS's released app version.

My app has multiple build configurations. How do I set a default build configuration for xcodebuild?

In Xcode, the Configurations section of your project's Info pane provides a pop-up menu, which sets the default configuration to be used by xcodebuild when building a target. Use this pop-up menu to select a default build configuration for xcodebuild as seen in Figure 2.

How do I run unit tests from the command line?

xcodebuild provides several options for running unit tests.

To build and run unit tests from the command line, execute the following command in Terminal:

To build unit tests without running them from the command line, execute the following command in Terminal:

To run unit tests without building them from the command line, execute any of the following command in Terminal:

The test action requires specifying a scheme and a destination. See How do I implement the Build For Testing and Test Without Building features from the command line? for more information about build-for-testing and test-without-building actions.

The -workspace option allows you to specify the name of your workspace. Use this option when your scheme is contained in an Xcode workspace.

The -project option allows you to specify the name of your Xcode project. Use this option when your scheme is contained in an Xcode project. It is required when there are multiple Xcode projects in the same directory and optional, otherwise.

The -destination option allows you to specify a destination for your unit tests. It takes an argument <destination-specifier>, which describes the device, simulator, or Mac to use as a destination. It consists of a set of comma-separated key=value pairs, which are dependent upon the the device, simulator, or Mac being used.

Tools

The -only-testing and -skip-testing options, which are optional, allow you to run only a specific test and to skip a test, respectively. They take an argument <test-identifier>, which specifies the test to be executed or excluded. test-identifier's format is as follows:

TestTarget, which is required, is the name of the test bundle. TestClass and TestMethod, which are both optional, respectively represent the name of the class and the name of the method to be tested.

Note: See Xcode Scheme and Run your app in Simulator for more information about scheme and destination, respectively.

  • For macOS apps, destinationspecifier supports the platform and arch keys as seen in Table 1. Both keys are required for running your unit tests in macOS.

    Table 1 Supported keys for macOS apps.

    Key

    Description

    Value

    platform

    The supported destination for your unit tests.

    macOS

    arch

    The architecture to use to run your unit tests.

    i386 or x86_64

    See Listing 10 for an example that tests a scheme in macOS and where destinationspecifier is set to 'platform=macOS,arch=x86_64'.


    Listing 10 Tests the macOS scheme for 64-bit in macOS.

  • For iOS and tvOS apps, destinationspecifier supports the platform, name, and id keys as seen in Table 2.

    Table 2 Supported keys for iOS and tvOS apps.

    Key

    Description

    Value

    platform

    The supported destination for your unit tests.

    iOS (for iOS apps)tvOS (for tvOS apps)

    name

    The full name of your device to be used for your unit tests.

    The name of your device as displayed in the Devices Organizer in Xcode.

    id

    The identifier of your device to be used for your unit tests.

    See Locate a device identifier for more information about getting your device identifier.

    The name and id keys are intergeably used with platform, which is a required key as seen in Listing 11 and Listing 12.


    Listing 11 Tests the iOS scheme on a device identified by 965058a1c30d845d0dcec81cd6b908650a0d701c.


    Listing 12 Testing the iOSApp scheme on an iPhone.


    Listing 13 Do not test iOSAppUITests on an iPhone.


    Listing 14 Only testing SecondTestClass' testExampleB in the iOSAppTests unit test.

  • For iOS Simulator and tvOS Simulator apps, destinationspecifier supports the platform, name, id, and OS keys as seen in Table 3.

    Table 3 Supported keys for iOS Simulator and tvOS Simulator apps.

    Key

    Description

    Value

    platform

    The supported destination for your unit tests.

    iOS Simulator (iOS apps)tvOS Simulator (tvOS apps)

    name

    The full name of the simulator (iOS simulator for iOS apps and tvOS Simulator for tvOS apps) to be used for your unit tests and as displayed in the run destination of your Xcode project.

    The name of your device as displayed in the Devices Organizer in Xcode.

    id

    The identifier of your device to be used for your unit tests.

    See Locate a device identifier for more information about getting your device identifier.

    OS

    The version of iOS or tvOS to simulate such as 9.0 or the string latest to indicate the most recent version of iOS supported by your version of Xcode.

    An iOS version, tvOS version, or latest

    The name and id keys are intergeably used with platform, which is a required key as shown in Listing 15 and Listing 16. The OS key is optional.


    Listing 15 Tests the iOS scheme on an iPad Pro (12.9 inch) with iOS 10.2 in the Simulator.


    Listing 16 Tests the tvOS scheme on an tvOS Simulator identified by D6FA2C2A-E297-406A-AA22-624B4834ACB2.

The -destination option also allows you to run the same unit test on multiple destinations. This is done by adding it multiple times to your xcodebuild test command as demonstrated in Listing 17.

Listing 17 Tests the iOS scheme in both the Simulator and on an iPod touch.

Note: xcodebuild runs your tests sequentially. For instance In Listing 17, xcodebuild will first test iOS in the Simulator before executing it on the iPod touch.

How do I implement the Build For Testing and Test Without Building features from the command line?

  • xcodebuild provides the build-for-testing action for Xcode's Product > Build For > Testing feature. You must specify a scheme to use it. To use it, execute the following command in Terminal:

    See How do I run unit tests from the command line? for more information about xcodebuild build-for-testing's options.


    Listing 18 Builds tests and associated targets in the tvOS scheme using the tvOS Simulator identified by D6FA2C2A-E297-406A-AA22-624B4834ACB2.

    build-for-testing generates an xctestrun file, which is saved in the derived data folder. See xcodebuild.xctestrun's man page for more information about xctestrun files.

  • xcodebuild provides the test-without-building action for Xcode's Product > Perform Action > Test Without Building feature. test-without-building requires that you specify either a scheme or an xctestrun file.

    • Usage when using a scheme

      See How do I run unit tests from the command line? for more information about xcodebuild test-without-building's options.

      Important: When using a scheme, test-without-building searches for bundles in the build root (SYMROOT). Therefore, be sure to build your target or that your build root includes the bundles to be tested before running this command. See Xcode Help's Build settings reference for more information about SYMROOT.


      Listing 19 Tests the iOSApp scheme on an iPhone SE with iOS 10.1 in the Simulator.

    • Usage when using an xctestrun file

      where <your_xctestrun_name> is the name of the file containing your test run parameters. See xcodebuild.xctestrun' s man page for more information about xctestrun files. See How do I run unit tests from the command line? for more information about the other options.

      Important: When using an xctestrun file, test-without-building searches for bundles at paths specified in the file. Therefore, be sure that the bundles exist at the specified paths before running this command.


      Listing 20 Testing bundles and other parameters specified in iOSApp_iphonesimulator.xctestrun using the iOS Simulator identified by 6DC4A7BA-EA7F-40D6-A327-A0A9DF82F7F6.


      Listing 21 Tests everything but iOSAppUITests specified in iOSApp_iphonesimulator.xctestrun using the iOS Simulator identified by 3D95DF14-E8B7-4A05-B65B-78F381B74B22.

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Note:build-for-testing and test-without-building provide support for continuous integration systems.

What keys can I pass to the exportOptionsPlist flag?

Install Xcode Cli Tools

To get all available keys for -exportOptionsPlist, run the following command in Terminal:

Listing 22 Fetching all keys supported by -exportOptionsPlist.

See Figure 3 for a sample file that contains some options for the -exportOptionsPlist flag.

How do I archive and export my app for distribution?

Install Xcode Command Line Tools Mac

Tools

To archive and export your app for distribution, run the following command in Terminal:

where <xcarchivepath> specifies the archive or the path of the archive to be exported, <destinationpath> specifies where to save the exported product, and <path> is the path to the file with a list of options for the -exportOptionsPlist flag.

Listing 23 Exports the iOSApp archive to the Release location with the options saved in the OptionsPlist.plist.


Document Revision History


DateNotes
2017-06-19

Updated the 'How do I run unit tests from the command line?' question.Added the 'How do I implement the Build For Testing and Test Without Building features from the command line?' and 'What keys can I pass to the exportOptionsPlist flag?' questions.

Updated the 'How do I run unit tests from the command line?' question.Added the 'How do I implement the Build For Testing and Test Without Building features from the command line?' and 'What keys can I pass to the exportOptionsPlist flag?' questions.

2014-05-21

New document that provides answers to frequently asked questions about command-line tools.


Command

Install Xcode Cli Tools


Install Xcode Cli Tools

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